Entrepreneurship for students at Emory University's Goizueta Business School

Entrepreneurship For Students

  • Applied Entrepreneurship(Charles Goetz)

    This course is a second level course for those students who have previously taken BUS 436, designed specifically for future entrepreneurs and business leaders. While the first level class is focused around building a business plan and pre-launch of a business, this class is focused on the actual “how to” of starting, building and running a business. In this course, you and your team will act as CEOs of a new venture. The primary goal of this class is provide you with as close an experience as possible to actually starting and implementing your own business. This class is very “hands on” and active class participation is critical. We will focus on several essential business and entrepreneurial concepts including determining where risks and opportunities exist within the competitive landscape; creating tactics that are high impact and easy to implement; understanding how to increase your sales closing rates and grow your business quicker; leveraging your effectiveness of working with partners and minimize the risks associated with partnering; negotiating effectively with investors (or as an investor); determining if a business should be closed or if it is worth investing more time and money; and recognizing when is the best time to sell your business and establishing how much it is really worth.

    Entrepreneurial Practicum (Klaas Baks & Charles Goetz)

    This course discusses in the depth all facets of operating and financing an entrepreneurial venture. The class structure is unconventional. The core of the course consists of students applying their knowledge at actual entrepreneurial ventures (practicum) and be actively involved in a commercialization forum (forum). The class room time supplements and is secondary to the core experience of working with entrepreneurial ventures. To ensure that students are prepared to provide maximum value to their entrepreneurial venture, the class will have a broad focus on understanding the key attributes of successful ventures and understanding strategies and tactics used to increase the probability of success. The course is divided into three modules. The first module consists of evaluating entrepreneurial ventures (valuing them, assessing their likelihood of success). The second module consists of strategies and techniques (including marketing, sales, finance) to enhance value for an entrepreneurial venture. The third module features a broad overview of financing methods for entrepreneurial ventures and how to prepare and negotiate a deal with capital providers. Throughout these three modules student teams will apply their knowledge at an entrepreneurial venture and be actively involved in a commercialization forum in which companies present to seasoned investors. The primary audience for this course are:

    1. students interested in starting their own company or joining an entrepreneurial venture and
    2. students interested in joining firms that capitalize entrepreneurial ventures (angels, venture capital firms, private equity firms, family offices, endowments, sovereign wealth funds, pension funds, etc.).

    The secondary audience for this course is students planning careers that have significant interaction with entrepreneurial ventures or those that finance these ventures (investment advisors, consultants, etc.).

    Appcology: New Commerce Infrastructure(Benn Konsynski)

    This course will explore issues associated with the emerging forms of applications and services changing software ecosystems and commerce interactions. We will involve both design and development of real apps, gizmos, and widgets. This course will enable students to learn the design, development and distribution of the small and the many, and leave with a portfolio, not just a certificate. This will be a workshop/project-oriented course and participants will work on themed projects in app development, including work with Emory Communications, the Halle Institute, and other Emory schools and centers. In addition, participants will lead and contribute to themes at an Emory App Fair on mobile applications.

  • Featured Club: Entrepreneurship Summit

    The Emory Entrepreneurship Summit is designed to encourage, celebrate, and enhance entrepreneurial endeavors amongst Emory students in all programs, with a particular focus on supporting undergraduate ventures. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from the experiences of outstanding entrepreneurial alumni, showcase their own ideas, and network with others to share best practices and new ideas.

  • Research Spotlight: Entrepreneurship Database Program at Emory

    Despite the emergence of hundreds of accelerator programs around the world, we know little about their effectiveness or how differences across programs influence venture performance. To address this gap, Social Enterprise @ Goizueta at Emory University and the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs (ANDE) launched the Global Accelerator Learning Initiative (GALI) in collaboration with a consortium of public and private funders. GALI builds on the Entrepreneurship Database Program at Emory University, which works with accelerator programs around the world to collect and analyze data describing the entrepreneurs that they attract and support.

Applied Entrepreneurship(Charles Goetz)

This course is a second level course for those students who have previously taken BUS 436, designed specifically for future entrepreneurs and business leaders. While the first level class is focused around building a business plan and pre-launch of a business, this class is focused on the actual “how to” of starting, building and running a business. In this course, you and your team will act as CEOs of a new venture. The primary goal of this class is provide you with as close an experience as possible to actually starting and implementing your own business. This class is very “hands on” and active class participation is critical. We will focus on several essential business and entrepreneurial concepts including determining where risks and opportunities exist within the competitive landscape; creating tactics that are high impact and easy to implement; understanding how to increase your sales closing rates and grow your business quicker; leveraging your effectiveness of working with partners and minimize the risks associated with partnering; negotiating effectively with investors (or as an investor); determining if a business should be closed or if it is worth investing more time and money; and recognizing when is the best time to sell your business and establishing how much it is really worth.

Entrepreneurial Practicum (Klaas Baks & Charles Goetz)

This course discusses in the depth all facets of operating and financing an entrepreneurial venture. The class structure is unconventional. The core of the course consists of students applying their knowledge at actual entrepreneurial ventures (practicum) and be actively involved in a commercialization forum (forum). The class room time supplements and is secondary to the core experience of working with entrepreneurial ventures. To ensure that students are prepared to provide maximum value to their entrepreneurial venture, the class will have a broad focus on understanding the key attributes of successful ventures and understanding strategies and tactics used to increase the probability of success. The course is divided into three modules. The first module consists of evaluating entrepreneurial ventures (valuing them, assessing their likelihood of success). The second module consists of strategies and techniques (including marketing, sales, finance) to enhance value for an entrepreneurial venture. The third module features a broad overview of financing methods for entrepreneurial ventures and how to prepare and negotiate a deal with capital providers. Throughout these three modules student teams will apply their knowledge at an entrepreneurial venture and be actively involved in a commercialization forum in which companies present to seasoned investors. The primary audience for this course are:

  1. students interested in starting their own company or joining an entrepreneurial venture and
  2. students interested in joining firms that capitalize entrepreneurial ventures (angels, venture capital firms, private equity firms, family offices, endowments, sovereign wealth funds, pension funds, etc.).

The secondary audience for this course is students planning careers that have significant interaction with entrepreneurial ventures or those that finance these ventures (investment advisors, consultants, etc.).

Appcology: New Commerce Infrastructure(Benn Konsynski)

This course will explore issues associated with the emerging forms of applications and services changing software ecosystems and commerce interactions. We will involve both design and development of real apps, gizmos, and widgets. This course will enable students to learn the design, development and distribution of the small and the many, and leave with a portfolio, not just a certificate. This will be a workshop/project-oriented course and participants will work on themed projects in app development, including work with Emory Communications, the Halle Institute, and other Emory schools and centers. In addition, participants will lead and contribute to themes at an Emory App Fair on mobile applications.

Featured Club: Entrepreneurship Summit

The Emory Entrepreneurship Summit is designed to encourage, celebrate, and enhance entrepreneurial endeavors amongst Emory students in all programs, with a particular focus on supporting undergraduate ventures. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from the experiences of outstanding entrepreneurial alumni, showcase their own ideas, and network with others to share best practices and new ideas.

Research Spotlight: Entrepreneurship Database Program at Emory

Despite the emergence of hundreds of accelerator programs around the world, we know little about their effectiveness or how differences across programs influence venture performance. To address this gap, Social Enterprise @ Goizueta at Emory University and the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs (ANDE) launched the Global Accelerator Learning Initiative (GALI) in collaboration with a consortium of public and private funders. GALI builds on the Entrepreneurship Database Program at Emory University, which works with accelerator programs around the world to collect and analyze data describing the entrepreneurs that they attract and support.

3M

New Jobs accounted for by startups (Bureau of Labor Statistics)

65%

Amount of net new jobs generated by small businesses since 1995 (Forbes)

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