Accepted Study Abroad Students

Congratulations on your acceptance to a BBA exchange program! This is an exciting time as you are filled with anticipation and curiosity on what this cross-cultural experience will bring you. You may have a lot of questions about life abroad, how you will find housing, what the food and cultural norms are in your host country, what courses you can enroll in at your host university, how to get your passport and visa to enter the country, health and safety precautions, and what to pack for your time overseas.

Accepted students will be required to attend a send-off meeting that will address important information and final steps for students to study abroad.

Before You Leave

BBA International Programs and/or the host school will send you information about class registration and housing (as applicable). For most other tasks, you will take the lead role. You can read more about these on this pre-departure map

Insurance Requirements

Students participating in any study abroad program at Emory University, including BBA exchange programs, are required to have international health insurance, liability insurance, and repatriation and evacuation coverage. To facilitate this directive, Emory has contracted with an insurance provider to provide a high quality, low cost plan. The insurance coverage is effective during the abroad program dates, and is intended as a supplement to primary health insurance.  Like all enrolled Emory students, study abroad participants must also maintain primary health insurance coverage via Aetna Student Health or a plan that meets the waiver guidelines. Plan your budget accordingly.

Please note that if your host school or country requires you to purchase their insurance, Goizueta Business School will consider this satisfactory for the study abroad supplement required for all participants. It is your responsibility to make sure you follow and obtain insurance requirements for your school/country.

International Student ID Cards (ISIC)

Emory students studying abroad may elect to get the ISIC, International Student ID Card, which provides proof recognized world-wide of your student status (great for discounts!). ISICs can be obtained online.

International SOS – Emergency Services Provider

BBA study abroad students will be provided with International SOS membership information before going abroad. As member of the SOS network, students can use SOS in the event of a health or safety emergency abroad. However, whatever services you call on SOS to provide must be paid for by you personally. SOS is a special emergency service provider; it is not insurance.

Students should also register their trip abroad with International SOS, for expedited help in case of emergency. Students can also upload copies of passports and other documents, sign up for medical and security reports, find English speaking doctors abroad, get help finding if medications are legal in certain countries, look up detailed information about countries, and call them collect 24/7. This is an invaluable resource! Learn more at http://www.internationalsos.com.

Travel Clinic Services

The EUSHS Travel Clinic provides consultation and vaccinations for students preparing for international travel on a reduced fee-for-service basis. International travel consultations, including immunizations, travel prescriptions and country specific information, are available Monday - Friday by appointment only. Appointments should be scheduled at least two weeks prior to travel outside of the country. To make a travel appointment, please schedule through "Your Patient Portal" or call 404.727.7551.

If you wish to learn more about vaccines, please visit Travel Health Online to receive free, up-to-date information about which vaccines you will need for each country you plan to visit (registration required).

Safety and Security

The health and safety of any Emory student studying abroad is a primary concern for the BBA International Programs Office. Take the quiz below to test your level of preparation. Knowing the answers to these key questions will be critical to your pre-departure planning as well as the base to having a pleasant and productive time abroad. Remember you are ultimately responsible for the choices you make regarding your safety! Many places abroad are safer than the U.S., but your lack of familiarity with the culture, language, people and locales may put you at higher risk.
Do you know the answers to these questions?

  • What does the State Department recommend regarding travel to this country?
  • What shots or immunizations do you need in order to gain entry into the host country?
  • What is the number one health risk in country?
  • What is the most common safety risk in country?
  • Does your program include a special insurance policy that will cover you while abroad?
  • Who are you going to contact in an emergency?

Risk and Safety Preparation

The safety of our students is of the utmost importance to us. It is our chief concern. Unfortunately, there are no guaranties when it comes to safety - not at home, as 9/11 so tragically demonstrated, and not abroad. Nonetheless, risk can be limited. To that end, we strongly encourage our students to read thoroughly and to take seriously the risk and safety information provided below and to stay aware of current events in the countries in which they will be studying.

Four Principles of Personal Risk Preparedness While Studying Abroad

1. Awareness

Students should be aware of local hotspots and events. Read local newspapers and magazines, also keep up with international newspapers (e.g. International Herald Tribune, Newsweek, Economist, Financial Times, etc.) Learn from local residents which areas of town are safe or dangerous and when to avoid certain locations. For example, normally safe areas may become more risky late at night, during soccer games, or political rallies. Determine which means of transportation are safe and secure, and at what time of day. Which is safer late at night: public transportation (buses, subways, etc.) or taxis? This varies from country to country. When traveling from a familiar city to an unfamiliar area, ask for advice and research safe areas before departing. We would like to add however, that participating in a demonstration is not a good way to raise awareness!

2. Communication

Uncertainty causes a great deal of anxiety. Students are asked to check in regularly with their family, by phone or e-mail. Cell phones are quite inexpensive in many countries; many plans do not charge to receive calls. Students should inquire with host school which cell phone plans are best. For many parents, simply knowing that they can reach their student at anytime day or night, reduces anxiety considerably. BBA International Programs also asks that you check in with us regularly by e-mail or phone. Notify us if you have a concern about your safety, or just to say that things are fine. We appreciate hearing from students.

3.Cultural Common Sense:

Gaining cross-cultural understanding is one of the most important and profound learning experiences students have while abroad. Students can apply their newfound cross-cultural understanding to help preserve their safety. The first point is to recognize that cultures are different, even if they appear similar. While all cultures value safety and stability, the ways they achieve it may vary considerably. Students can enhance their experience and personal safety by learning the answers to the following cultural questions:

  • What do people in this culture value most? 
  • How are reputations made or ruined? 
  • What behaviors, manners or clothing blend-in and which demand attention? 
  • How do people respond to uncertainty or difference? Are they open or do they feel threatened? 
  • What are the cultural norms for alcohol in the host country? 
  • What reputation do U.S. students have? Do my actions, behavior and dress reinforce the negative or the positive?

4. Personal Responsibility:

Many people are concerned about study abroad students' safety and security – including parents and friends, the BBA International Programs staff and the University, the hosting institution and people responsible for accommodation abroad. However , no one will be as involved or concerned as you, the student. Personal safety and security begins with the multitude of decisions each student makes on a daily basis; which includes the transportation methods you choose, whom you associate with, when and where you go out, etc. By being aware, employing cultural common sense and making responsible, intelligent choices, students can greatly narrow the risks to their own safety. By far, the greatest threat to student safety involves alcohol. That alcohol impairs one's judgment is well known, but too often ignored. Although drinking across cultures is not necessarily as dangerous as drinking and driving, overindulgence, especially in an unfamiliar country, can result in equally negative consequences.

Additional Tips on Reducing Risk

  • Stay informed, by local news and people. 
  • Have documents and cash ready, including passport and air tickets. 
  • Be aware that unspoken behaviors—your dress, table manners, use of personal space, and more—can identify your nationality without you even speaking.
  • Until you know your audience, don't discuss politics, and certainly don't feel compelled to defend any US policy in a bar. 
  • Avoid American hangouts unless you specifically want to be identified with people who also frequent them.

Diversity Abroad

For the majority of students, study abroad is an amazing and sometimes life-changing experience. But just like life at your home school, you may encounter some discrimination on your travels. Diverse students face discrimination. People might judge you based on your ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, age, religion, or gender. Remember, there is nowhere in the world 100-percent free of ignorant people. Whatever happens, don’t let the possibility of discrimination prevent you from experiencing the many benefits of study abroad. Inform yourself beforehand about diverse groups so you have an idea of what to expect during your trip.

The Facts

International experiences have had a tremendous effect on the personal and professional lives of individuals from all kinds of diverse backgrounds. While no place is completely free from discrimination, some students actually discover less discrimination abroad than at their home universities. You will learn a lot about your host country’s culture and your own by living in another country.

Curiosity or discrimination?

You may discover that what first seems like discrimination is actually curiosity. Your challenge is to figure out the difference. People may stare at you or ask questions that you find insensitive. Another thing to keep in mind is that people outside of the U.S. tend to be less concerned about “political correctness.”

At times you may find someone to be saying something that you find offensive. However, they may not realize that it is offensive to you; in fact, what they say may be perfectly acceptable in their society. In other words, the two of you are not attuned to each other’s cultural norms.

An opportunity to change minds

In many parts of the world, a person’s only connection with Americans and certain cultural groups comes from what they see on TV or in movies. Sometimes the media doesn’t portray these groups, such as minorities, in a favorable light. As such, you have the opportunity to be a representative for minorities, people with disabilities, GLBT students, adult students, people of your religion, and/or women abroad. Show who you are and be an ambassador for your culture abroad. In this way, you can help change the perceptions of diverse groups for the positive.

Additional Resources

Source: DiversityAbroad.com

International SOS

BBA study abroad students will be provided with International SOS membership information before going abroad. As member of the SOS network, students can use SOS in the event of a health or safety emergency abroad. However, whatever services you call on SOS to provide must be paid for by you personally. SOS is a special emergency service provider; it is not insurance.

Students should also register their trip abroad with International SOS, for expedited help in case of emergency. Students can also upload copies of passports and other documents, sign up for medical and security reports, find English speaking doctors abroad, get help finding if medications are legal in certain countries, look up detailed information about countries, and call them collect 24/7. This is an invaluable resource! Learn more at http://www.internationalsos.com.

Helpful Safety and Travel Resources and Links

  •  
    • Excitement and euphoria
    • General anticipation of everything that you are about to experience
    • Everything and everyone you encounter is new and many times exciting
    • You’ll probably be eager to learn the language spoken in your host country
    • Some of your initial excitement dissipates
    • Feelings of anxiety, anger and homesickness creep in
    • You might reject your new environment and begin to have a lack of interest in your new surroundings
    • You’ll become frustrated with trying to speak a foreign language
    • Don’t blame the host country or its people for your feelings. Your anxiety and frustration happens to millions of people who study, work or travel abroad.
    • Remember, you’re in a new environment and getting accustomed takes time. How you handle this frustration determines how you to grow from your experience abroad.
    • Don’t be negative; you’ll only prolong the feelings of frustration.
    • Stay positive. Think about the experience you’re having living abroad and learning about new people, food, and culture.
    • Try keeping a journal chronicling your experiences.
    • You become more familiar with the culture, people, food and language of your host country
    • You will have made friends
    • You become less homesick
    • You’ll be more comfortable with speaking and listening to the language spoken in your host country
    • You become more comfortable and relaxed in your new environment
    • You better handle the situations you previously found frustrating
    • You’ll be able to compare the good and bad of your host country with the good and bad of your home country
    • You feel less like a foreigner and more like your host country is your second home
    • You laugh about things that frustrated you at earlier stages of cultural shock
  • Culture Shock

    NOTE: The following culture shock information and tips for study abroad were obtained with permission from the Diversity Abroad. For more information, visit their web site.

    When you go abroad you’re going to experience new cultures, people, food, music and probably a new language. All of the newness combined with the lack of things and people that you are familiar with might cause you to have some anxiety. This type of anxiety is called cultural shock. Expect to experience some degree of cultural shock.

    Cultural shock can be categorized into four stages. It is important to become familiar with each stage and learn how to recognize the stage and utilize coping mechanisms for each.

    Honeymoon Stage

    Think of the first stage of cultural shock as the honeymoon stage. This occurs in the first few days of you arriving in your host country. During the honeymoon stage you will be poised to take on the challenges of living abroad.  Symptoms of honeymoon stage:

    Frustration Stage

    After the honeymoon stage your initial excitement may wane. You also may start to feel frustration; this is the onset of the frustration stage. Frustration can occur for various reasons.
    Symptoms of the frustration stage:

    How to handle the frustration stage

    Understanding Stage

    The understanding stage arrives when you develop a more balanced view of your experience abroad.
    Characteristics of the understanding stage

    Acclimation Stage

    During the acclimation stage you will begin to feel like you really belong in your new environment. Once you reach the acclimation, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you can live successfully in two cultures; this is a huge milestone.
    Characteristics of the acclimation stage

    Source: http://www.diversityabroad.com/cultural-shock

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    <body>
    <p>Congratulations  on your acceptance to a BBA exchange program! This is an exciting time as you  are filled with anticipation and curiosity on what this cross-cultural  experience will bring you. You may have a lot of questions about life abroad,  how you will find housing, what the food and cultural norms are in your host  country, what courses you can enroll in at your host university, how to get  your passport and visa to enter the country, health and safety precautions, and  what to pack for your time overseas. </p>
    <p>Accepted  students will be required to attend a send-off meeting that will address  important information and final steps for students to study abroad. </p>
    <p><strong>Before You Leave</strong><br />
      BBA International Programs and/or the host school will  send you information about class registration and housing (as applicable). For most  other tasks, you will take the lead role. You can read more about these on this pre-departure map. This is a PDF</p>
    <p><strong>Insurance  Requirements </strong></p>
    <p>Students participating in any study abroad program at  Emory University, including&nbsp;BBA exchange programs, are required to  have&nbsp;international health insurance, liability insurance, and repatriation  and evacuation coverage. To facilitate this directive, Emory has contracted  with an insurance provider to provide a high quality, low cost plan. The  insurance coverage is effective during the abroad program dates, and is  intended as a supplement to primary health insurance.  Like all enrolled Emory students, study  abroad participants must also maintain primary health insurance coverage via  Aetna Student Health or a plan that meets the waiver guidelines. Plan your  budget accordingly.</p>
    <p>Please note that if your host school or country requires  you to purchase their insurance, Goizueta Business School will consider this  satisfactory for the study abroad supplement required for all participants. It  is your responsibility to make sure you follow and obtain insurance  requirements for your school/country.</p>
    <p><strong>International  Student ID Cards (ISIC)</strong><br />
      Emory students studying abroad may elect to get the ISIC,  International Student ID Card, which provides proof recognized world-wide of  your student status (great for discounts!). ISICs can be obtained <a href="http://www.isic.org/" target="_blank">online</a>.</p>
    <p><strong>International SOS  – Emergency Services Provider</strong><br />
      BBA study abroad students will be provided with  International SOS membership information before going abroad. As member of the  SOS network, students can use SOS in the event of a health or safety emergency  abroad. However, whatever services you call on SOS to provide must be paid for  by you personally. SOS is a special emergency service provider; it is not  insurance. <br />
      <br />
      Students should also register their trip abroad with International SOS, for  expedited help in case of emergency. Students can also upload copies of  passports and other documents, sign up for medical and security reports, find  English speaking doctors abroad, get help finding if medications are legal in certain  countries, look up detailed information about countries, and call them collect  24/7. <strong>This is an invaluable resource! </strong>Learn  more at <a href="http://www.internationalsos.com/" target="_blank">http://www.internationalsos.com</a>.</p>
    <p><strong>Travel Clinic  Services</strong><br />
      The EUSHS Travel Clinic provides consultation and  vaccinations for students preparing for international travel on a reduced  fee-for-service basis. International travel consultations, including  immunizations, travel prescriptions and country specific information, are  available Monday - Friday by appointment only. Appointments should be scheduled  at least two weeks prior to travel outside of the country. To make a travel  appointment, please schedule through "<a href="https://www.shspnc.emory.edu/login_directory.aspx">Your Patient Portal</a>"  or call 404.727.7551.<br />
      If you wish to learn more about vaccines, please visit <a href="https://www.tripprep.com/scripts/main/default.asp" target="_blank">Travel  Health Online</a>&nbsp;to receive free, up-to-date information about which  vaccines you will need for each country you plan to visit (registration  required). </p>
    <p><strong>Safety and Security </strong><br />
      The health and safety of any Emory student studying  abroad is a primary concern for the BBA International Programs Office. Take the  quiz below to test your level of preparation. Knowing the answers to these key  questions will be critical to your pre-departure planning as well as the base  to having a pleasant and productive time abroad. Remember you are ultimately  responsible for the choices you make regarding your safety! Many places abroad  are safer than the U.S., but your lack of familiarity with the culture,  language, people and locales may put you at higher risk.<br />
      Do you know the answers to these questions?</p>
    <ul>
      <li>What does the State Department recommend  regarding travel to this country? </li>
      <li>What shots or immunizations do you need in order  to gain entry into the host country? </li>
      <li>What is the number one health risk in country? </li>
      <li>What is the most common safety risk in country? </li>
      <li>Does your program include a special insurance  policy that will cover you while abroad? </li>
      <li>Who are you going to contact in an emergency? </li>
    </ul>
    <p><strong>Risk and Safety  Preparation</strong></p>
    <p>The safety of our students is of the utmost importance to  us. It is our chief concern. Unfortunately, there are no guaranties when it  comes to safety - not at home, as 9/11 so tragically demonstrated, and not  abroad. Nonetheless, risk can be limited. To that end, we strongly encourage  our students to read thoroughly and to take seriously the risk and safety  information provided below and to stay aware of current events in the countries  in which they will be studying.</p>
    <p><strong>Four Principles of  Personal Risk Preparedness While Studying Abroad </strong></p>
    <p><strong>1. Awareness</strong></p>
    <p>Students should be aware of local hotspots and events.  Read local newspapers and magazines, also keep up with international newspapers  (e.g. International Herald Tribune, Newsweek, Economist, Financial Times, etc.)  Learn from local residents which areas of town are safe or dangerous and when  to avoid certain locations. For example, normally safe areas may become more  risky late at night, during soccer games, or political rallies. Determine which  means of transportation are safe and secure, and at what time of day. Which is  safer late at night: public transportation (buses, subways, etc.) or taxis?  This varies from country to country. When traveling from a familiar city to an  unfamiliar area, ask for advice and research safe areas before departing. We  would like to add however, that participating in a demonstration is not a good  way to raise awareness! </p>

      <p><strong>2. Communication</strong></p>

    <p>Uncertainty causes a great deal of anxiety. Students are  asked to check in regularly with their family, by phone or e-mail. Cell phones  are quite inexpensive in many countries; many plans do not charge to receive  calls. Students should inquire with host school which cell phone plans are  best. For many parents, simply knowing that they can reach their student at  anytime day or night, reduces anxiety considerably. BBA International Programs  also asks that you check in with us regularly by e-mail or phone. Notify us if  you have a concern about your safety, or just to say that things are fine. We  appreciate hearing from students. </p>
    <p><strong>3.Cultural Common Sense:</strong></p>
    <p>Gaining cross-cultural understanding is one of the most  important and profound learning experiences students have while abroad.  Students can apply their newfound cross-cultural understanding to help preserve  their safety. The first point is to recognize that cultures are different, even  if they appear similar. While all cultures value safety and stability, the ways  they achieve it may vary considerably. Students can enhance their experience  and personal safety by learning the answers to the following cultural  questions: </p>
    <ul>
      <li>What do people in this culture value most?&nbsp; </li>
      <li>How are reputations made or ruined?&nbsp; </li>
      <li>What behaviors, manners or clothing blend-in and  which demand attention?&nbsp; </li>
      <li>How do people respond to uncertainty or  difference? Are they open or do they feel threatened?&nbsp; </li>
      <li>What are the cultural norms for alcohol in the  host country?&nbsp; </li>
      <li>What reputation do U.S. students have? Do my  actions, behavior and dress reinforce the negative or the positive?</li>
    </ul>
    <p><strong>4. Personal Responsibility: </strong></p>
    <p>
        Many people are concerned about study abroad students' safety and security –  including parents and friends, the BBA International Programs staff and the  University, the hosting institution and people responsible for accommodation  abroad. However , no one will be as involved or concerned as you, the student.  Personal safety and security begins with the multitude of decisions each  student makes on a daily basis; which includes the transportation methods you  choose, whom you associate with, when and where you go out, etc. By being  aware, employing cultural common sense and making responsible, intelligent  choices, students can greatly narrow the risks to their own safety. By far, the  greatest threat to student safety involves alcohol. That alcohol impairs one's  judgment is well known, but too often ignored. Although drinking across  cultures is not necessarily as dangerous as drinking and driving,  overindulgence, especially in an unfamiliar country, can result in equally  negative consequences.</li>
    </ul>
    <h4>Additional Tips on  Reducing Risk </h4>
    <ul>
      <li>Stay informed, by local news and people.&nbsp; </li>
      <li>Have documents and cash ready, including  passport and air tickets.&nbsp; </li>
      <li>Be aware that unspoken behaviors—your dress,  table manners, use of personal space, and more—can identify your nationality  without you even speaking. </li>
      <li>Until you know your audience, don't discuss  politics, and certainly don't feel compelled to defend any US policy in a  bar.&nbsp; </li>
      <li>Avoid American hangouts unless you specifically  want to be identified with people who also frequent them.</li>
    </ul>
    <h4>Diversity Abroad</h4><p>
      For the majority of students, study abroad is an amazing  and sometimes life-changing experience. But just like life at your home school,  you may encounter some discrimination on your travels. Diverse students face  discrimination. People might judge you based on your ethnicity, disability,  sexual orientation, age, religion, or gender. Remember, there is nowhere in the  world 100-percent free of ignorant people. Whatever happens, don’t let the  possibility of discrimination prevent you from experiencing the many benefits  of study abroad. Inform yourself beforehand about diverse groups so you have an  idea of what to expect during your trip. </p>
    <h4>The Facts</h4>
    <p>International experiences have had a tremendous effect on  the personal and professional lives of individuals from all kinds of diverse  backgrounds. While no place is completely free from discrimination, some  students actually discover less discrimination abroad than at their home  universities. You will learn a lot about your host country’s culture and your  own by living in another country.</p>
    <h4>Curiosity or discrimination?</h4>
    <p>You may discover that what first seems like  discrimination is actually curiosity. Your challenge is to figure out the  difference. People may stare at you or ask questions that you find insensitive.  Another thing to keep in mind is that people outside of the U.S. tend to be  less concerned about “political correctness.” <br />
    At times you may find someone to be saying something that  you find offensive. However, they may not realize that it is offensive to you;  in fact, what they say may be perfectly acceptable in their society. In other  words, the two of you are not attuned to each other’s cultural norms.</p>
    <h4>An opportunity to change minds </h4>
    <p>In many parts of the world, a person’s only connection  with Americans and certain cultural groups comes from what they see on TV or in  movies. Sometimes the media doesn’t portray these groups, such as minorities,  in a favorable light. As such, you have the opportunity to be a representative  for minorities, people with disabilities, GLBT students, adult students, people  of your religion, and/or women abroad. Show who you are and be an ambassador  for your culture abroad. In this way, you can help change the perceptions of  diverse groups for the positive. </p>
     <h4> Additional Resources</h4>
      ·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/minority-study-abroad" target="_blank">Minority  Students Abroad</a> <br />
      ·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/religious-" target="_blank">Religious  Diversity Abroad</a> <br />
      ·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/sexual-orientation-abroad" target="_blank">Sexual  Orientation Abroad</a> <br />
      ·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/disable-students-abroad" target="_blank">Students  With Disabilities Abroad</a> <br />
      ·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/women-study-abroad-safety" target="_blank">Women  Abroad</a></p>
    <p><em>Source: </em><a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/multicultural-study-abroad" target="_blank">DiversityAbroad.com</a></p>
    <h4>International SOS</h4><p>
      BBA study abroad students will be provided with  International SOS membership information before going abroad. As member of the  SOS network, students can use SOS in the event of a health or safety emergency  abroad. However, whatever services you call on SOS to provide must be paid for  by you personally. SOS is a special emergency service provider; it is not  insurance. </p>
      <p>
      Students should also register their trip abroad with International SOS, for  expedited help in case of emergency. Students can also upload copies of  passports and other documents, sign up for medical and security reports, find  English speaking doctors abroad, get help finding if medications are legal in  certain countries, look up detailed information about countries, and call them  collect 24/7. <strong>This is an invaluable  resource! </strong>Learn more at <a href="http://www.internationalsos.com/" target="_blank">http://www.internationalsos.com</a>.</p>
    <p>Helpful Safety and Travel Resources and Links<br />
      <a href="http://www.state.gov/" target="_blank">U.S.  State Department </a><br />
      <a href="http://studentsabroad.state.gov/" target="_blank">Students  Abroad site by U.S. State Department </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://travel.state.gov/visa/americans/americans_1252.html" target="_blank">Department of State, Tips for Students Studying Abroad </a>&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html" target="_blank">Department  of State, Travel Warnings and Consular Information Sheets </a><br />
      <a href="http://www.studentsabroad.com/contents.html">Study  Abroad Student Handbook</a> <br />
      <a href="http://www.osac.gov/" target="_blank">Overseas  Security Advisory Council </a><br />
      <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/" target="_blank">Centers for  Disease Control </a><br />
      <a href="http://www.who.int/en/" target="_blank">World  Health Organization </a>&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/default.stm" target="_blank">BBC World News </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://www.countryreports.org/" target="_blank">Country  reports </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/" target="_blank">CIA World Factbook </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://www.internationalsos.com/" target="_blank">International  Scholastic Overseas Services </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cshome.html" target="_blank">The Library of Congress Country Studies </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://globaledge.msu.edu/" target="_blank">GlobalEdge </a>:&nbsp;Michigan State University's global business knowledge portal <br />
      <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/" target="_blank">Diversity  Abroad </a>&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />
      <a href="http://www.mccombs.utexas.edu/BBA/IP/Prospective/Links.aspx">Travel Links</a>  (Thanks again, McCombs!)</p>
    <p><strong>Culture Shock</strong></p>
    <p>NOTE: The following culture shock information and  tips&nbsp;for study abroad&nbsp;were obtained with permission from the  Diversity Abroad. For more information, visit their <a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/reverse-cultural-shock">web site</a>.</p>
    <p>When you go abroad you’re going to experience new  cultures, people, food, music and probably a new language. All of the newness  combined with the lack of things and people that you are familiar with might  cause you to have some anxiety. This type of anxiety is called cultural shock.  Expect to experience some degree of cultural shock.</p>
    <p>Cultural shock can be categorized into four stages. It is  important to become familiar with each stage and learn how to recognize the stage  and utilize coping mechanisms for each.</p>
    <h4>Honeymoon  Stage</h4>
    <p>Think of the first stage of cultural shock as the  honeymoon stage. This occurs in the first few days of you arriving in your host  country. During the honeymoon stage you will be poised to take on the  challenges of living abroad.  Symptoms of  honeymoon stage: </p>
    <ul>
      <li>Excitement and euphoria </li>
      <li>General anticipation of everything that you are  about to experience </li>
      <li>Everything and everyone you encounter is new and  many times exciting </li>
      <li>You’ll probably be eager to learn the language  spoken in your host country </li>
    </ul>
    <h4>Frustration  Stage</h4>

    <p>After the honeymoon stage your initial excitement may  wane. You also may start to feel frustration; this is the onset of the  frustration stage. Frustration can occur for various reasons.<br />
      Symptoms of the frustration stage: </p>
    <ul>
      <li>Some of your initial excitement dissipates </li>
      <li>Feelings of anxiety, anger and homesickness  creep in </li>
      <li>You might reject your new environment and begin  to have a lack of interest in your new surroundings </li>
      <li>You’ll become frustrated with trying to speak a  foreign language </li>
    </ul>
    <p>How to handle the frustration stage </p>
    <ul>
      <li>Don’t blame the host country or its people for  your feelings. Your anxiety and frustration happens to millions of people who  study, work or travel abroad. </li>
      <li>Remember, you’re in a new environment and  getting accustomed takes time. How you handle this frustration determines how  you to grow from your experience abroad. </li>
      <li>Don’t be negative; you’ll only prolong the  feelings of frustration. </li>
      <li>Stay positive. Think about the experience you’re  having living abroad and learning about new people, food, and culture. </li>
      <li>Try keeping a journal chronicling your  experiences. </li>
    </ul>
    <h4>Understanding  Stage </h4>
    <p>The understanding stage arrives when you develop a more  balanced view of your experience abroad. <br />
      Characteristics of the understanding stage</p>
    <ul>
      <li>You become more<strong> </strong>familiar with the  culture, people, food and language of your host country </li>
      <li>You will have made friends </li>
      <li>You become less homesick </li>
      <li>You’ll be more comfortable with speaking and  listening to the language spoken in your host country </li>
      <li>You become more comfortable and relaxed in your  new environment </li>
      <li>You better handle the situations you previously  found frustrating </li>
    </ul>
    <h4>Acclimation  Stage </h4>

    <p>During the acclimation stage you will begin to feel like  you really belong in your new environment. Once you reach the acclimation,  you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you can live successfully in two  cultures; this is a huge milestone. <br />
      Characteristics of the acclimation stage </p>
    <ul>
      <li>You’ll be able to compare the good and bad of  your host country with the good and bad of your home country </li>
      <li>You feel less like a foreigner and more like  your host country is your second home </li>
      <li>You laugh about things that frustrated you at  earlier stages of cultural shock </li>
    </ul>
    <p><em>Source: </em><a href="http://www.diversityabroad.com/cultural-shock">http://www.diversityabroad.com/cultural-shock</a></p>
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